Posts tagged stuff to blow your mind

 
posted by Molly
Carla Chavarria’s new project “Por Ella” photographs DREAM Activists with the women they support and whom they are supported by. 
Look how strong they are.

 

posted by Molly

Carla Chavarria’s new project “Por Ella” photographs DREAM Activists with the women they support and whom they are supported by.

Look how strong they are.

Data Clarity: How Racism is Bad for Our Bodies

posted by Molly

Journalism is just another form of storytelling. You’re telling a set of factual truths, hopefully, but data is just data. As a journalist, you get to decide what story to tell. The article from “The Atlantic” above tells a very clear story with some very clear data (I must be on a clarity kick.). Here’s the money quote of data:

"The scale and scope of stop-and-frisk practices in communities of color have left many residents feeling that they are living under siege," ... In 2011, there were 685,724 stops. In 70 of 76 precincts, greater than 50 percent of stops targeted blacks and Latinos. In 33 precincts, that number skyrockets to over 90 percent. Perhaps most shockingly, the number of stops of young black men (168,126) actually exceeded the number of young black men in New York City (158,406).

However, supporters of Stop and Frisk argue that it is an effective crime control tool and, if you want to avoid a stop, then do not commit a crime. The problem is that 90 percent of black and Latino men stopped were innocent. What might this mean in terms of heightened vigilance and stress? Not only must black and Latino people in New York anticipate acts of prejudice from the police, but they also must know innocence does not reduce the risk of harassment.

posted by Molly
The Opte Project creates visualizations of the 14 billion pages that make up the network of the web. Science is beautiful!Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2013/02/any-two-pages-on-the-web-are-connected-by-19-clicks-or-less/#ixzz2MEEiVq4n 

posted by Molly

The Opte Project creates visualizations of the 14 billion pages that make up the network of the web. Science is beautiful!

Read more: http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2013/02/any-two-pages-on-the-web-are-connected-by-19-clicks-or-less/#ixzz2MEEiVq4n 

DREAMer

posted by Molly

See the way the video stretches across the whole screen, and serves for the background for the navigation panel? How cool is that?

Reminds me of print book jackets, the way that the title is incorporated into the design and how the best designs incorporate clearly connected visuals for the back, spine, and front.

"hipster is a transplant thing. im a bay area native, we're so much better."

posted by Hatty

The Mission, San Francisco. 21st and Treat. Mangoes and papayas and cantaloupes from a frutaria, passed bright yellow red brick houses, and up a short flight of stairs across a tiny but pleasant courtyard. Two glasses of sangria in, a dinner party, the Atlantic article read out loud.

We were an hour deep in discussing what gentrification means, what that looks like now compared to three or four decades ago at the height of the Redevelopment Agency and the Urban Renewal programs. Surely Asian immigrant families buying houses in the Bayview where poor black communities foreclosing at a rapid rate couldn’t possibly equal the same kind of gentrification as hipsters flooding the Mission post the dot-com boom? We questioned how we young professionals — mostly at nonprofits yes, but professionals nonetheless — contribute to this capitalistic/consumerism-driven society that facilitates such displacement of different communities of color, low-income and working-class folks.

It was a lovely discussion. And I was really glad that everyone occupying the living room was on the same wavelength. Some of us had met for the first time that night, some of us were college buddies, some coworkers. We gathered for a summer potluck and a conversation in the home of a young couple soon to be wed, both public school teachers, both Chinese Americans.

Somehow this community had found itself; more accurately, we, the children of the revolution, had found each other. This became even more obvious in the car ride back to Berkeley with Susan, a med student at University of California, San Francisco. She talked about the particularities of politics in the City, which both of us knew quite intimately as organizers and residents. Then she said that the Bay progressive people were special, that nowhere in the country would people speak the way we do, about organizing, about religion, about community, politics, life. And I agreed.

I guess what I want to say isn’t actually about gentrification after all. Maybe it’s the love for the home we’ve created for ourselves here. For me, it comes back to the notion of rootedness again. The question isn’t simply, ‘Am I gentrifying this neighborhood?’ but rather more fundamental, ‘Why am I here?’

Why are we here? The hostess asked, and after a few moment, she answered herself, To start a family, take roots, organize the communities, invest in the people, make something new and beautiful out of the old.

posted by Molly

A completely unexpected video from the people at PBS. I like this one because it stays true to the message of Mr. Rogers, while completely flipping the format.

battles, bodies, Breaking: the evolution of The Calamities

by Hatty Lee. Photography by Still1

San Diego campus. Flor y Cantor Gallery, Humanities hallway. A selected few practice here every weekday for two to three hours in the evening. It’s a hard linoleum floor. There’s no protection. They don’t care. They put on their gear: jersey shorts, sleeveless shirts and sweats. A Macbook blares a dancehall mashup, jazzy big bands with horns and snares and loud beats on repeat.

Head spins and quick feet — they do in seconds what takes yoga gurus years to train. They are The Calamities, a breaking crew based in San Diego, and the “little brother crew” Forbidden Skillz Clan. Binly Krysada Phounsiri — the founder, also known on the floor as “Lancer” or “Lance LaRock” — stretches with Jacob “Shyism” Kang and Ian “Damon” Peeble. More kids walk in — typical skater boys with skinny jeans and plaid shirts, one sporting a hipster mustache. I get introduced to all of them, Joriel “Jor Vicious” Jose, Justin “Season” Sazon, and Wesley Jonson.

“To bring back the importance of originality, style, and identity in a breaker’s movement,” reads The Calamities’ Tumblr page. ‘Movement?’ I ask.

#onrevolution and coming to full-circle with rootedness

posted by Hatty

She stayed in Detroit when so many people had left. She decided that there was something in the life of that city worth throwing her whole lot into. She helped people re-imagine what new urban cores could look like — urban farmers, teachers, labor organizers, journalists, artists, everyone, all connected to the everyday reality of the city, the lives of the residents, the streets, the land.

Her name, Grace Lee Boggs, had only recently become familiar to me through Isaac Miller. An educator/organizer/writer and a sick slam poet from Cal, Isaac talked about Detroit often — where Grace had lived and worked for the last 50 years. Now anyone Issac thought awesome must be somebody; this Grace Lee Boggs must be one badass movement leader. So when all my social media feed began to explode with a news of her speaking engagement in San Francisco Chinatown, I knew I was going. On March 3 at 1pm, community-based organization staff and youth from all over the Bay Area including myself and a few SF Board of Supervisors packed the Chinese Culture Center, all eager to hear this 96-year-old woman.

posted by Hatty
More amazing to me than the photo itself is the photographer’s eye for that specific spot where he imagines will make a perfect shot with a moon rising over, a year before he actually stages this shoot.
Wouldn’t life be a little more interesting when we all walk around thinking this way?

posted by Hatty

More amazing to me than the photo itself is the photographer’s eye for that specific spot where he imagines will make a perfect shot with a moon rising over, a year before he actually stages this shoot.

Wouldn’t life be a little more interesting when we all walk around thinking this way?

Context Matters...

posted by Molly

…or weather doesn’t. The “wimpy Seattle snowstorm” meant that it took me 30 hours to get to Dallas (thirty two if you count hours spent getting to and from airports). But I do love some regional bickering.