Posts tagged Molly Higgins

APA Author Interview — Lisa Lim, New York City

posted by Molly

Children’s literature is a great battlefield for hearts, minds, and cultural norms. So it’s always good to find authors committed to creating stories about multiracial/crosscultural families. Because it’s nice to see oneself reflected in the eyes of the next generation.

The interview is from APALA, the Asian Pacific American Librarians Association, a kickass group of (you guessed it) Asian and Pacific American librarians, bring meaningful diversity and Asian American issues into libraries and literature.

posted by Molly

Caterpillar Suit I, 2007
Caterpillar Suit II, 2008
Anodized Aluminum, brass, razor wire
Walter Oltmann, South African, Natal Province, born 1960
Promised gift of the Vascovitz Family, 2008.114.1 and 2008.114.2

A caterpillar and a conquistador have mixed their exoskeletons together. Both are voracious: caterpillars eat copious amounts of leaves, just as conquistadors often ravage people in their path. But both are vulnerable—scientists issue warnings that the insect population is showing signs of decline, and the role of the conquistador alone in strange new worlds was always a tenuous one.
Subtle hints about the origin of the artist are perceptible: one of the few places that have taken inexpensive metal wire and made it into art is the Natal Province of South America, where Walter Oltmann was raised and learned firsthand how Zulu women weave wire baskets. The spikes of razor wire are a reminder of the strife-conflicted cityscapes in South Africa. Oltmann is currently a senior lecturer at the University of the Witwaterstrand in Johannesburg.

posted by Molly

Caterpillar Suit I, 2007

Caterpillar Suit II, 2008

Anodized Aluminum, brass, razor wire

Walter Oltmann, South African, Natal Province, born 1960

Promised gift of the Vascovitz Family, 2008.114.1 and 2008.114.2

A caterpillar and a conquistador have mixed their exoskeletons together. Both are voracious: caterpillars eat copious amounts of leaves, just as conquistadors often ravage people in their path. But both are vulnerable—scientists issue warnings that the insect population is showing signs of decline, and the role of the conquistador alone in strange new worlds was always a tenuous one.

Subtle hints about the origin of the artist are perceptible: one of the few places that have taken inexpensive metal wire and made it into art is the Natal Province of South America, where Walter Oltmann was raised and learned firsthand how Zulu women weave wire baskets. The spikes of razor wire are a reminder of the strife-conflicted cityscapes in South Africa. Oltmann is currently a senior lecturer at the University of the Witwaterstrand in Johannesburg.

What do we gain when we institutionalize? And of course, what do we lose? Does being paid for art give us freedom to concentrate whole heartedly on said art or does it shackle us further to diverging interests? Can something similar be said for activism as a job v. a labor of love?
posted by Molly

Getting the Body You've Always Wanted

posted by Molly

Maybe this would have been more timely in spring. Or maybe it’s perfect because fall is here and instead of thinking of cozy, bulky layers, we’re still thinking about about skin tight jeans and crop tops. Did I say we? Let me rephrase that to me.

posted by Molly
Looking for something to kickstart your creative process this weekend? Look no further than my two favorite drinks— beer and coffee (although whiskey has been making some serious gains lately!)— and let the good times roll. Just remember— creativity is a great power, so use it for good. How can you harness mild stimulants for social change?
Infographic courtesy of ilovecoffee.jp

posted by Molly

Looking for something to kickstart your creative process this weekend? Look no further than my two favorite drinks— beer and coffee (although whiskey has been making some serious gains lately!)— and let the good times roll. Just remember— creativity is a great power, so use it for good. How can you harness mild stimulants for social change?

Infographic courtesy of ilovecoffee.jp

posted by Molly

Frequently. I feel the urge to wheat paste posters. All over my apartment walls. A living history of art and purpose. Buried. Constantly. Underneath itself.
This week. In honor of the clitoris. A street art campaign. Led by Sophia Wallace.
Cliteracy!

posted by Molly

Frequently. I feel the urge to wheat paste posters. All over my apartment walls. A living history of art and purpose. Buried. Constantly. Underneath itself.

This week. In honor of the clitoris. A street art campaign. Led by Sophia Wallace.

Cliteracy!

We’re Back!

Like a dinosaur story.

And that’s news you can use!

(Cliches, 2. Me, 0.)

The very intelligent among you…

…may have noticed the summer hiatus we’ve taken. Yes, indeed.

In the fall, good things will return. Including the next print edition, which is crawling to the presses as I type.

posted by Molly
As an undergrad, my Christian Fellowship encouraged students to get involved with movements that showed people love and respect, whether those movements were Christian or not. One project was tutoring men in a rehab program trying to find jobs or earn GEDs. The other was sorting and sending books to inmates. Both experiences impressed on me how the quality of donations can radically affect the quality of someone’s life.
Without access to modern software, how can a person really prepare to reintegrate into society? What message does it send to a person trying to learn to read when the only books available to them are “easy readers” designed for children?
Print dictionaries were/are always in demand.
My experiences there drew me to gitmobooks’s Tumblr. Each post shows part of the Guantanamo prison library collection available to detainees. 
gitmobooks:

Angry Birds video game

posted by Molly

As an undergrad, my Christian Fellowship encouraged students to get involved with movements that showed people love and respect, whether those movements were Christian or not. One project was tutoring men in a rehab program trying to find jobs or earn GEDs. The other was sorting and sending books to inmates. Both experiences impressed on me how the quality of donations can radically affect the quality of someone’s life.

Without access to modern software, how can a person really prepare to reintegrate into society? What message does it send to a person trying to learn to read when the only books available to them are “easy readers” designed for children?

Print dictionaries were/are always in demand.

My experiences there drew me to gitmobooks’s Tumblr. Each post shows part of the Guantanamo prison library collection available to detainees. 

gitmobooks:

Angry Birds video game

Out of the archives | Movements and Moments

posted by Molly


In my other persona, I’m a libraries person with a love of Asian American Studies and the intersections of access, discovery, and technology. So happy Asian American Heritage Month, I combined all my interests into one project, called Out of the Archives.

Out of the Archives highlights digital archival material from collections and archives that focus on Asian America. The project aims to raise the profile of not-terribly-famous Asian Americans doing regular stuff, and the organizations working to preserve that history.

Check it out. Self promotion is just another word for cross pollination.